Sunday, November 23, 2014

Searching For The Twins

Snowstorm by Maurice de Vlaminck

One of the principle painters in the Fauvist movement, de Vlaminck disliked Picasso for the way Cubism supplanted Fauvism. This painting is hard to date but appears to be most similar to work de Vlaminck produced around 1920.

I did a little internet research to write this as I have not heard of this Flemish painter (though he painted mostly along the Seine south of Paris) before today. He wrote fiction, some of it when a young man "mildly pornographic", was a violinist and teacher of music, and later wrote poetry as well.

Chosen by Tess as a writing prompt for Mag 247

Searching For The Twins

There are moments on
this road like pirouettes in
some neglected field
where resolute stoats
(forgotten in this toothed time
of children not found)
do scream of cloudy
spills of white. The wind flutter
of my decision,
black storm upon storm
this miserable, stains me
with sap from dread bark.

‎November ‎23, ‎2014 9:07 AM

This poem was fashioned to include all twelve of the words offered in Brenda Warren's Sunday Whirl, Wordle 188


19 comments:

  1. resolute stoats...now there's an image to write about!
    Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stoats... Wind In The Willows, anyone?

      Delete
  2. Delicious write...I had to read it out loud...mm...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had to read it aloud too. A couple words changed that way before I published. It's good advice. I do it often. Thank you.

      Delete
  3. I like how you took two prompts and made it your own. I never would've known you were under word constraints!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not see the words as constraint but as a container. English is among the most synonym filled languages on the planet. I have good vocabulary so it is easy for me to slide in and out of the language. The challenge is to use the twelve words in so few lines. I had to average one wordle word per line. I averaged four words per line.

      More accurately, I count syllables per Haiku three line seventeen syllable fashion as my form. This forces me into one and two syllable words for the most part. That's part of the reason for the tone of my poetry. It is terse because the majority by far of my words are one syllable.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful, and it has a dark feel about it. A good read!
    http://poetryofthenetherworld.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-gap.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It has always seemed much easier to write passably in some dark mood than in a light one. It is also much easier to noodle around in the minor keys in music. I am not sure why that is.

      Delete
  5. Lovely piece, "With sap from dread bark"- nice close.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found "dread" by accident. I could have written "dead". I like dread much better. Thank you for noticing.

      Delete
  6. Interesting take on the prompt which I found interesting to read.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Striking response to the prompt...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found the painting striking. The poem evolved as I wrote, contained within the twelve words. Near the end the idea of the lost children in a winter scene became obvious to me. I really like putting everything into position using the title to do it.

      Delete
  8. powerful indeed...dread bark a favorite..x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Kay. An accidental word here as I explained. Dread and Dead. Adding one single letter changes everything. Since the children are not yet if ever found "dread" is a much better choice.

      Delete
  9. "Black storm upon storm...." really good.

    ReplyDelete

The chicken crossed the road. That's poultry in motion.


Get Your Own Visitor Map!