Sunday, February 17, 2013

The Wind of History - A Magpie Tale

The Wind of History, Jacek Yerka
Offered by Tess Kincaid as a Magpie Tale writing prompt
Meets "Fair Use" restrictions

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The Winds Of History

The car got itself
stuck on the way to your house,
missed the gate, thank God,
but still we had to
get out and walk to meet you,
thinking all the way
how the walls are down
and how many had to come
asking why the world
stalls at your command.

All the reports say it clear
how you refuse pleas
right now, how you turn
right to know into veto
power.

The sun won't
rise as we think it
should and most trees have gotten
into two strained lines.
The wind leaks and seeps
in dank and thin rows, streaming
from your open shades.

February 17, 2013 10:39 AM


22 comments:

  1. Your last stanza catches the spirit of the painting exactly - bleak as the wind that leaks...

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  2. yes I'm with Jinksy...great last lines
    "The wind leaks and seeps
    in dank and thin lines......

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    Replies
    1. Jinsky, Gerry, the last lines were the most difficult part of the poem, rewritten several times.

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  3. loving the dank and thin lines...x

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  4. brilliant poem- for it speaks loud and clear about undone tasks facing our feckless leaders

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  5. Is that the White House, so unreachable by ordinary means, in your poem? Cool....

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    1. Wow! I didn't think to read this thing your way until you suggested it. Omigawd!

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  6. This sounds lyrical to me, Chris...like song...

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  7. Nice write, like it's about some ageing barrister. Very descriptive

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  8. I wondered if this one was going to resonate. I needn't have worried it seems.

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  9. This is a great poem, doing the painting justice. What seemed to turn on a hinge for me was "how to turn right to know into veto power."

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  10. i love the feel of it, surreal, dark, indeed like the painting

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  11. I, too, made the political connection and the White House in tatters connect ... such interesting word choices that made me think of lines being drawn and empty bags of winds spouting out through house windows, etc etc ... me thinks your subconscious was having its say here! Brilliant!

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    Replies
    1. Perhaps you are right. I have had this experience many times in my life, saying something meaning what I mean or maybe not meaning very much and having other people take it all quite differently. Sometimes it is really funny but I didn't mean the joke. I grin and bear it in those cases. Who doesn't want to appear like a really good comedian?

      In this case. I really had no politics in mind. Oh well. I can hardly argue when I use words like veto and images like most trees getting into two strained lines even though that image is exact to the photo itself.

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  12. This has great atmosphere and asks so much...how..why! Loved it
    Hugs
    SueAnn

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  13. Found it fascinating how many readers connected your poetry with politics (as did I.) Shows how much it's on our minds. Very nice, Christopher.

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    1. Well it's obvious that without meaning to I helped that along quite precisely.

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  14. I love the whole premise of this poem.
    So cool.

    =)

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  15. Politicians...you have captured them well...They are balloons of hot air...

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  16. This is fantastic. It has the feel of such a deep story coming before, and leaves you wondering what will come after. It's like a snap shot into another fascinating world which is what good poetry is all about. bravo!

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The chicken crossed the road. That's poultry in motion.


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